Somalia rain. Creative Commons: Frank Nyakairu, 2014.

Restoring Degraded Coasts in Somalia

July 11, 2015

Restoring Degraded Coasts in Somalia

LDF supports a project by Adeso – founded by Goldman Prize winner Fatima Jibrell – to restore Somalia’s severely degraded coastal ecosystems and fisheries by working closely with the communities to better manage their marine and timber resources.

In Somalia, climate change, ecological decay, disease, food insecurity and conflict have overlapped catastrophically for decades, posing a huge challenge to local communities as well as the ecosystem. Somalia has the longest coast in Africa and the coastal and marine environment has been critical for the country’s livelihoods, food security, ecology, trade and culture. Since the 1991 civil war, Somalia’s coast and marine ecosystem has suffered enormously due to illegal and unsustainable fishing practices, hazardous waste dumping, erosion, and the destruction of mangroves for charcoal. All of these have destabilized the coastal and nearshore environment and destroyed the marine habitat. Additionally, with fisheries degraded and few legal employment options (unemployment among young people is 67%), Somali fishermen were drawn into piracy and extremism.

The grant will go to the organization Fatima Jibrell founded and led for 22 years,  Adeso. The organization has successfully worked with local communities preserve and restore Somalia’s rangeland and tree cover, by reducing the illegal charcoal trade.

LDF is supporting Adeso’s current large-scale project to restore and protect Somalia’s degraded coastal and marine ecosystems to improve marine health, stabilize food security for the region and improve local livelihoods. Activities to achieve this goal include;

  • Identifying coastal communities on the Puntland coast to pilot community- managed habitat restoration and coastal agriculture and fisheries infrastructure and training.
  • Conducting mangrove restoration and plant date palm nurseries in selected communities, activities critical to restoring ecological damage and providing better livelihoods and food security.
  • Providing trainings in sustainable fishing techniques, marketing and business skills, and value chains for fishermen and others in the communities, to ensure that they can gain economically from their marine resources, while preserving fisheries for future generations.
  • Improving infrastructure (boats, nets, shallow wells, irrigation) to revitalize community fisheries and agriculture.

 

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