Brazil's coastal forest. Creative Commons: Miguel Vieira, 2011.

Restoring Brazil’s Atlantic Coastal Forest

July 11, 2015

Restoring Brazil’s Atlantic Coastal Forest

Led by SavingSpecies, this project will support the acquisition and restoration of wildlands in Brazil’s Atlantic Coastal Forest (Mata Atlântica) so that rare plants and animals can flourish once again in a region known for its incredible biodiversity.

Human actions are driving species to extinction a thousand times faster than the natural rate. Most conservation efforts focus on big charismatic animals like tigers and elephants but this isolated strategy will not prevent the current free fall in global extinction rates. The majority of threatened species are lesser known with very unique habitats and small geographic ranges. These critically important animals and plants are concentrated in only a few global ecosystems that are unfortunately being decimating by the endless and indiscriminant need for resources.

SavingSpecies works to reduce the rate of extinction by identifying regions in the world where extinctions are concentrated, determining areas that need to be reconnected, and then acquiring and restoring the land so that biodiversity can flourish once again.

Related News

Mexico must act now to save the Vaquita porpoise

Proximity to the fishing villages has diminished the vaquita population from 60 individuals two years ago to an estimated 30 individuals as of today.

Nature illuminated as never seen before

If Nature could draw its own map, what would it look like? One answer would be a map of the land area painted in 846 colors—representing a world not divided by political boundaries, but by ecoregions.

Saudi Arabia to invest $50 billion in solar and wind

Saudi Arabia is the world’s biggest crude oil exporter, but they jumping into the renewable energy scene in a huge way.

Scientists fear for the Great Barrier Reef’s future after it is hit with back to back bleaching years

New scientific survey shows two-thirds of coral have died due to global warming.

Rights of Nature movement spreads as India and New Zealand give legal personhood to glaciers and rivers

New Zealand and India recognize nature as ‘legal persons’ in conservation bid, extending the Rights of Nature movement.