New Film ‘Biomimicry’ Explores Nature’s Technology

October 29, 2015

New Film ‘Biomimicry’ Explores Nature’s Technology

Biomimicry, the practice of looking deeply into nature for solutions to engineering, design and other challenges, has inspired a film about it’s ground-breaking vision for creating a long-term, sustainable world. This film covers how mimicking nature solves some of our most pressing problems, from reducing carbon emissions to saving water.

The film, titled “Biomimicry” features Janine Benyus, and premiered at SXSWEco.

These organisms are the consummate engineers, the consummate chemists and technologists. They have learned how to do it in context. So that is the core idea behind biomimicry… that the best ideas might not be ours.  — Janine Benyus

The film is brought to you by Leonardo DiCaprio, Executive Producers Oliver Stanton, directed by Leila Conners, produced by Mathew Schmid and Bryony Schwan, created by Tree Media and with Executive Producers Roee Sharon Peled and George DiCaprio.

For more information please visit the Biomimicry website.

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